Showing posts with label Haveri. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Haveri. Show all posts

Sri Siddarameshwara Temple, Neeralgi, Haveri


‘Neeralgi’ or ’Niralagi’ is situated about 20 km from the town of Hubballi and is located off the Bengaluru – Pune National Highway. During my recent visit to Hubballi for a wedding, I managed to take a sneak peek of this temple along with a few of my friends. This beautiful temple is located outside the village of Neeralgi and from the outset seems to have been built during the later Kalyana Chalukya period apart from some elements added by the Hoysalas. An inscription found here states that this place was initially known as ‘Nerulage’ and also goes on to record the construction of the Mallinath Jinalaya along with the land grant made by Malla Gavunda (Nadaprabhu of Belahuge, present day’s Belavige). However, no basadi remains here now except for a few ruins spread across the village with the locals also confirming that there are no Jains living there as of today. The inscription was found in the premises of the old fort area and sadly nothing much of the fort survives today.  Thus one can easily assume that it was destroyed during the times of war or by the invaders. But the whereabouts of the Jain temple and its inhabitants still remains a mystery.
Sri Siddarameshwara Temple, Neeralgi
Sri Siddarameshwara Temple, Niralagi
 Also surprisingly, no inscription related to the construction of the Sri Siddarameshwara temple has been found till date. But on the basis of its style of construction, it can be assigned to the 12th century Kalyana Chalukya period. The inscription belonging to a much later period on a pillar of the Navaranga of the temple speaks about the restoration work of this temple carried out by Yakshadeva of Huligere. The temple comprises of a garbhagriha, an antarala and a navaranga with two mukhamantapas, of which the eastern mukhamantapa has collapsed. The garbhagriha houses a Shiva Linga along with the guardian Lord Nandi in the antarala. There are 2 devakosthas/niches on either side of the antarala, one housing a murti of the Saptamatrikas (the seven mother-goddesses) and the other a murti of Lord Vishnu (which doesn’t seem like the original). There is a beautiful makara torana in front of the antarala built in classical Chalukyan style; sadly which has been covered by a modern day photo. Although we were unable to witness the carvings on the Kapota portion, the locals informed us about the presence of images of Lords Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.
Inscription on the Pillar regarding Restoration of the Temple
Lord Shiva and The Makara Torana
Rati, Manmatha and  Nandi along with Attendants(both sides) as Dwarapalas
 A heavily decked Dravidian Shikara crowns the garbhagriha (sanctum sanctorum) which is attached to a beautiful vestibule. The keertimukha carved on the vestibule/sukanasi is vibrant and elaborately carved. What’s more interesting is the presence of Lord Vishnu’s Dashavatara on it.  This may have been a later addition when the temple was under the Hoysala rule. The Shikara has a unique pattern for karna kutas which are circular shape with grooves on its circumference, similar to a mechanical gear system unlike the commonly seen square/rectangular ones. Why it was carved so and what it really represents would be interesting to decipher or was it merely an architectural element added to enhance the beauty of the temple?
Shikara
Mechanical Gear System Arrangement
Karna Kutas on the Shikara
Keertimukha of Vestibule with Dasavatara Carved on it
The external walls have beautiful carvings of miniature shikaras and decorative pillars. There are three murtis inside the temple complex, of which one is quite interesting and rare to find. Though at the first look, the murti resembles that of Lord Dhanvantari and Vyasa Muni, a closer observation and further examination reveals more. However, the Dharwad Gazetteer mentions about the presence of a beautiful murti of Lord Bhairava in a seated posture in this temple, which helped us in identifying  the real identity of this murti. It can be confirmed that he murti is of Lord ‘Hariharapitamaha’ or Lord ‘Dattatreya’ who is a composite form of the Lords Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. Overall, it is a beautiful temple with many hidden mysteries waiting to be unravelled!
Lord Hariharapitamaha
Dravidian Shikara
Sekhari Shikara
Lord Varuna and his consort Carved on Makara Pranala
Hero stone

 References:
1.     Dharwad District Gazetteer – Karnataka State Government
2.    South Indian Inscriptions Vol. 18 – ASI

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  3. Top 50 lesser known must visit temples of Karnataka


Sri Tribhuvaneshwara Temple, Devagiri, Haveri

Sri Tribhuvaneshwara Temple, Devagiri, Haveri
Sri Tribhuvaneshwara Temple, Devagiri
'Devagiri' is a small village about 10 km from Haveri and close to the Bangalore - Pune highway. This place was called by different names by different dynasties such as Devingiri, Devageri and lastly as Devagiri. It is believed that a branch of Kadamba dynasty was ruling from "Triparvata" which is the oldest record name of Devagiri. Three copper records of the Kadambas were discovered in this village, two of which are dated to 455 AD  were issued by King Vijayasri Mrighesavarma and the remaining one was issued by the crowned prince Devavarma. All the three records speak about the construction and maintenance of  a Jain temple referred to as Arhat Bhagavata Chaityalaya. Though no Jain Basadi was found in this place, it is said that there is a mutilated murti of Lord Parshwanatha seated in padmasana posture behind a Mosque in a private land.
Ruins Scattered
Chalukyan Herostone
Veeragallu Belonging to Chalukyan Era
A stone inscription found here dated to 600 AD refers to a feudatory who was ruling this place from Banavasi. The other inscription dated to around 7th century AD speaks about the land grant given to a temple by the Badami Chalukyan Emperor Vikramaditya II. Another gives us information regarding a gift of one thousand cows by Amarakeerthy to the village temple in 8th century AD. Later this place was ruled by the Rashtrakuta king Govindabbe during 9th century AD as per a stone inscription here. The construction of the "Tribhuvaneshwara Temple" and a reservoir by Tribhuvanasingi is recorded in a 1102 AD inscription belonging to the Kalyani Chalukya King Vikramaditya VI. The various inscriptions found here mention about the temples built here such as the Chaityalaya, Kankaleshwara, Govindeshwara, Chatmeshwara, Grameshwara, Tribhuvaneshwara to name a few. Except for the Tribhuvaneshwara temple, most of the rest are either untraceable or modified beyond identification. Sri Tribhuvaneshwara temple  is popularly called now as the Basavanna and Eshwara temple.
Sri Tribhuvaneshwara Temple
The Front View
Sri Basavanna Temple
Shaiva Dwarapalaka and a Stone Inscription
Although the Eshwara/Tribhuvaneshwara temple has undergone restoration, the original structure has been retained wherever possible. Remains of the temple and its ruins seen spread across gives a fair idea of the destruction by the Bahamani sultans here. The Eshwara temple consists of a Garbhagriha, an antarala and Navaranga pretty much similar to the Basavanna temple. A rare and unique feature is the presence of a Makara torana at the threshold (Hostilu in Kannada) of the door. The door jambs of Antarala have some beautiful carvings of the Gandharvas. Many inscriptions and broken murtis are kept in the temple complex. There is a huge tank besides the temple which today is in  a ruined state, with few murtis scattered across. There is a much revered Lord Hanuman temple in the center of village which is believed to have been built by a Brahman Dewan under the Nawab of Savanur.
Navaranga, Antarala and Garbhagriha of Sri Tribhuvaneshwara Temple
Lord Ganesha with Gandharvas on the Door Jamb
Central Ceiling Decked with Lotus Flower Carving
Makara Torana Attached to Hostilu of Mukhamantapa
Part of Makara Torana
Damaged Navagraha Panel with only 6 Remaining
Further excavations are necessary in order to explore more about the history of this village and to rediscover and restore the lost temples. 

References:
1. Dharwad District Gazetteer - GOK

Shantheshwara Temple , Tilavalli

Tilavalli, a village located in Haveri district is home to a beautiful 12th century Chalukyan temple. The inscription in the temple complex gives details of its construction in 1239 AD by Kalideva Thakkura. The east facing temple has a grabhagriha housing a Shiva linga, an antrala and a huge Sabhamantapa. The Sabhamantapa has 48 lathe turned pillars. The central ceiling is heavy decked with Astadikpalas. On the outer walls  are carvings of erotic  figures.
East Entrance
Shikara

Lathe turned Pillar
Ceiling
Inscription Stone
A Closer Look at the Pillar
Erotic Images
This temple is a good piece of art from the Yadava Period. Though the temple was open during our visit, the priest was unavailable for gathering more information. The temple needs more maintenance and restoration.
A joyful moment
    With this post, Teamgsquare completes a joyful journey four years of adventure, traveling, learning, and sharing .
  

   

Malnad Monsoon and Magic - IV



   Malnad (Malenadu) more commonly known as the Western-Ghats or the Sahyadris is the air, water and food of South India, including Maharashtra. The Western Ghats cover an area of about 160000 sqkm, spreading across the five states viz, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Goa, Tamil Nadu and Kerala.  Malnad forms the right lung of India and is one amongst the last few remaining pristine tropical rain forests in the world. The Western Ghats is recognized as one of the top ten hottest biodiversity hotspots in the world and was recently recognized by the UNESCO as a world heritage site. A few areas spread across the Western Ghats have been given the world heritage site tag, which include mostly national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. The region of Malnad receives the highest rainfall in the country, second only to North-Eastern India.  The Ghats are richly forested having a rich and wide variety of flora and fauna. The place has a lot to offer to a traveler, being a treasure trove of wildlife sanctuaries, national parks, cascading waterfalls, unexplored forests, hidden forts, historic temples, winding roads, chilly hill stations, pilgrim centers, cultural centers and a never to forget tasty cuisine and ever hospitable people.  The warmth and generosity of the people of Malnad is truly unmatched and so is its beauty, magical and magnificent. Malnad surely possesses a mysterious power that makes it so magical especially during the monsoons.

Leaf Diamonds
Satellite Image
Birth of a River
Can you Spot Me ?
Twirled
High-bicsus
Pyramids of Nature
Misty Noon
Colorful Nature Bands