Showing posts with label Davangere. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Davangere. Show all posts

Sri Kalleshwara Temple, Bethuru, Davanagere

Sri Kalleshwara Swamy Temple, Bethuru, Davanagere
Sri Kalleshwara Swamy Temple, Bethuru
Having read about a beautiful Kalleshwara temple probably built by the Cholas in the district of Davanagere, it was always in the back of our minds to visit this interesting temple. There are quite a few temples in this region and Northern Karnataka built by the Cholas in the post Badami Chalukyan era. Earlier this year, we got a chance to visit Sri Basaveshwara temple at Hallur of Bagalkot district, also built by the Cholas around 8th century. Thus, it was quite intriguing to explore more Chola temples in the heartland of Karnataka, which otherwise is dominated by the Art and Architecture of the Hoysalas and Chalukyas. Bethuru is a small village lost in oblivion, and the was evident as many of my local friends were totally ignorant and uninformed of its location and whereabouts. Though this village popped up on the google map, we were surprised that the locals were unaware of its existence owing to its close proximity to Davanagere.
Places to visit near to Davangere
Sri Kalleshwara Swamy Temple
Places to visit around Davanagere
Chola temple, Davanagere
Front View of the Temple

We reached the village of Bethuru which is located at a distance of about 4 km without much difficulty and found the temple quite easily. However, we were displeased to witness such a beautiful temple in a sheer state of neglect, without any care or maintenance. While we were moving around, a person came by and introduced himself as the caretaker of Sri Kalleshwara temple, though an unofficial one. He visits the temple daily to do the necessary cleaning of the temple and decks up the god here with the flowers he collects. Though there are no daily pujas/rituals being performed here, he tries his best to keep the temple alive by lighting deepas (lamps) everyday. He shares his personal experience about how doctors gave up hope on his survival due to his chronic diabetic condition and that he would survive only for a few days. But ever since he started visiting this temple daily, he has only felt better, without facing any major health issues. He went on to explain that nobody in the village is interested in the upbringing of the temple and its maintenance, and whatever little money was raised to restore the temple was taken off by a few greedy people who ran away from the village and never returned. A lot of snakes happen to visit this temple regularly and embrace the Shiva Linga here, with one such incident having occurred recently during the Dasara festival. He showed us the remains of the shed skin of a snake inside the temple as a proof. He has carefully preserved it and shows it off to visitors with pride.
Snake Skin
Lord Kalleshwara
Murti of Goddess Saraswathi
Goddess Saraswathi

This temple was built either by Rashtrakutas or Nolambas between the 8th and 9th centuries. Later between 11th -13th  century, this temple under went a few additions/renovation under the Kalyana Chalukyas/ Uchangi Pandyas/ Hoysalas. Many hero-stones found here which are now kept near the temple belong to these dynasties. The most pleasing sight here is that of a beautiful carving on the ceiling panel of 'Gajasura Samara/ Gajasurasamhara' (depiction of Lord Shiva slaying the elephant demon Gajasura) in the central portion, surrounded by the Ashtadikapalas. The temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva in the form of a Linga, with murtis of goddesses Saraswathi and Sapthamatrikas and Lord Subramanya kept in the Navaranga of the temple. The Shikara of the temple is a perfect example of early Cholan architecture. This temple definitely needs and deserves more care and maintenance in order to be preserved for future generations.
Lord Gajasurasamhara Murti
Lord Gajasurasamhara Murti
Guardian of Directions - Asthadikpalas
 Lord Ishana and Parvathi Riding on Bull  (the Guardian of the North East Direction)
Veeragallus
Hero-Stones
The Typical Rashtrakuta Shikara
How to reach Bethuru: From Davanagere, take the road to Jagalur and travel for about 4 km to reach Bethuru.
Accommodation: Owing to its close proximity to Davanagere, accommodation is not very difficult, with one having a wide range of options suiting all budgets. Our preferred place for stay here was Hotel Anand Residency, situated besides the KSRTC bus stand.
Places to visit nearby: Anekonda, Harihara, Bagali, Unchangidurga, Unchangipura, Kanakuppa, Bankapura, Haveri, Ranebennur and many such.

References:
1. Puratattva

Related Posts:
1. Top 100 Lesser Known Temples of Karnataka
2. Chola Temples of Vagata
3. Chola Temples of Binnamangala

Sri Eshwara Temple, Anekonda, Davangere

Sri Eshwara Temple, Anekonda
Sri Eshwara Temple, Anekonda

'Anekonda', a suburb of Davangere town located off the Davangere-Jagalur highway is home to the beautiful Sri Eshwara Temple built during the 11th century. Anekonda gets its name due to the army of elephants  being tied here when Bethuru was the capital city of Chalukyas. This town was ruled by various dynasties starting from the Gangas, the Cholas, Chalukyas, Uchchangi Pandyas and the Hoysalas. This temple is believed to have been built by the Hoysalas though the style seems inclined more towards the Chalukyan architecture. The temple finds its mention in the 12th century Pandya and 13th century Hoysala inscriptions. The pillars here bear the trademark of Hoysala architecture of being stellar in plan.
Sri Eshwara Temple, Anekonda
Side View of Sri Eshwara Temple, Anekonda
Miniature Shikaras and Turrets
Closer Look of Miniature Shikara
The temple has been carefully renovated taking care to retain the old structure wherever possible. This temple was built on a  raised platform. Originally a dwikuta temple as per initial plan, it  has now been converted into a trikuta temple as one of its mukhamandapa has been transformed into a garbhagriha during renovation. This temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva and the main garbhagriha houses a Shiva linga, while the other garbhagriha remains empty. The central ceiling of its Navaranga has one of the most exquisitely carved Gajasurasamhara flanked by Lords Vishnu and Brahma. In the panel below are 7 Goblins associated with Lord Shiva who are shown playing music for the Lord's dance. In the panel above are 12 Adityas, the sons of Goddess Aditi. The other eight Ankanas of the Navaranga have shallow lotuses with their pendants bearing the carvings of their respective Dikpalas.
Lord Shiva
The Grand Central Ceiling
Central Ceiling with Gajasurasamhara murti
Lord Gajasurasamhara along with Lords Brahma and Vishnu, 7 Goblins and 12 Adityas
Dancing Mohini ( Lady with Scorpion)
Dancing Mohini (Note the Scorpion)
Rati Manmatha
Rati - Manmatha
Goddess Saraswathi
Goddess Saraswathi
Male Dancer in Vaishnava Sthanaka Pose
Male Dancer in Vaishnava Sthanaka Pose
A 32 Angled stellar Pillar
 Right in front of this temple is a small mandapa dedicated to Lord Nandi. The front porch on both sides have 5 friezes with sculptured railing at the top. In the top panels are various figures such as those of the Dwarapalakas, dancing Ganesha, rishis, Rati-Manmatha, goblins and other erotic figures. The ceiling of the eastern mukhamandapa has carving of Lord Indira riding on the elephant Airavata at the center accompanied by heavenly musicians.
Ceiling of Mukhamandapa
Front Porch Carvings

References:

Karnataka's Khajuraho - Bagali


Bagali, Davangere
The Kalleshwara Temple Complex
 Bagali is a small village located in the Harapanahalli taluk of Davangere district now moved to Bellary/Ballari district. The Kalleshwara temple here is considered to be one of the rare temples of India. Unique in its style and appearance, it is popularly regarded as Karnataka's Khajuraho. There are very few temples in India where the goddess and god of love (Rathi and Manmatha) are carved as Dwarapalakas. Here one can see the beautifully carved images of them guarding the temple. This temple was built during  the 9th century AD by the Rashtrakutas which later underwent modifications under the reign of Chalukyas and the Hoysalas.  
Kalleshwara Temple, Davanagere
Pillared Alley
Lathe Turned Pillar
Heavily Decked Door Jamb
Exquisitely Carved Lintel 
Temple Priest Feeding the Royal Elephant
Dwarf Drummer
Lord Bramha,Vishnu and Maheshwara
The Goddess and God of Love (Rati and Manmatha)
  Bagali is referred to as Baguli and was one of the capitals during the  rule of Hoysala King Ballala II. However, to a large extent the credit of building this temple goes to the Western Chalukyan king Vikramaditya VI. The main temple of Kalleshwara is extensively carved and has been built to perfection. The open Sabha mantapa/ Natya mantapa of the temple has 59 exquisitely carved pillars and none are similar. The four central pillars are the most beautiful with the detailing on them being parallel to none. While the ceilings of the mantapa are beautifully carved, the door-jambs are very skillfully executed and go on to serve as the perfect examples of Chalukyan architecture. 
Kalleshwara Temple Bagali
Sundari
  • Lord Ganesha
    Lord Ganesha
Killing of King Hiranyakaship
 Lord Shiva in the form of a big Linga is worshiped here even today. Many small shrines  dedicated to various gods are present around this temple. While major portion of the temple exteriors remain simple, the upper portion is adorned with reliefs of erotica. Though the erotic carvings beat that of Khajuraho in number (in depicting the various postures), they are far from being as perfect. With 62 carvings, it stands proudly as one housing the largest collection of erotica images. The prototypes of these images were taken to Paris for further examination as  a part of study and are now a part of the Paris Museum.
Erotica
The Water Source
Extensively Carved Hero Stone
The Temple Complex
 Related Posts:
1. Kanakuppa Fort, Near Jagalur

Malnad Monsoon and Magic - IV



   Malnad (Malenadu) more commonly known as the Western-Ghats or the Sahyadris is the air, water and food of South India, including Maharashtra. The Western Ghats cover an area of about 160000 sqkm, spreading across the five states viz, Maharashtra, Karnataka, Goa, Tamil Nadu and Kerala.  Malnad forms the right lung of India and is one amongst the last few remaining pristine tropical rain forests in the world. The Western Ghats is recognized as one of the top ten hottest biodiversity hotspots in the world and was recently recognized by the UNESCO as a world heritage site. A few areas spread across the Western Ghats have been given the world heritage site tag, which include mostly national parks and wildlife sanctuaries. The region of Malnad receives the highest rainfall in the country, second only to North-Eastern India.  The Ghats are richly forested having a rich and wide variety of flora and fauna. The place has a lot to offer to a traveler, being a treasure trove of wildlife sanctuaries, national parks, cascading waterfalls, unexplored forests, hidden forts, historic temples, winding roads, chilly hill stations, pilgrim centers, cultural centers and a never to forget tasty cuisine and ever hospitable people.  The warmth and generosity of the people of Malnad is truly unmatched and so is its beauty, magical and magnificent. Malnad surely possesses a mysterious power that makes it so magical especially during the monsoons.

Leaf Diamonds
Satellite Image
Birth of a River
Can you Spot Me ?
Twirled
High-bicsus
Pyramids of Nature
Misty Noon
Colorful Nature Bands